Fig Wine

Ingredients

  • 1kg Dried Figs
  • 500g raisins
  • 1.5kg sugar
  • High Alcohol yeast
  • Pectolase
  • Yeast Nutrient

Method

This will produce a medium to sweet wine. In fact it is more like a sweet sherry than a wine but delicious none-the-less.

  1. Chop up the figs and raisins and place in a fermenting bin or a clean food grade bucket.
  2. Pour 4 pints of boiling water over the fruit, then add the sugar.
  3. Leave this overnight. Cover with a clean cloth to prevent any contamination.
  4. The next day you can add the rest of ingredients as well as 2 pints of cold water. The wine should start bubbling within about 24 hours. Stir and mash about a couple of times a day.
  5. After about 5 days of fermenting, you can strain off the solids using a coarse straining bag.
  6. Place the liquid into a clean sterilised demijohn and top up, filling it to  the shoulders with cold water. Now fit an airlock and leave to ferment out at room temperature.
  7. This may take a few days or a couple of weeks depending on the temperature. Use a BrewBelt in colder months if needed.
  8. Once the bubbles stop coming up through the airlock, or at least they slow down to about once every 2 minutes or so, test the wine.
  9. You can use a hydrometer or just taste it, if you like the taste go on to the next step.
  10. Don’t be fooled into thinking that it is too sweet. It is meant to be a sweet wine; more like a sherry.
  11. If you think it is too dry, you could add more sugar (although this will give you even more alcohol). Simply add 50g of sugar at a time until it completely stops fermenting. You won’t usually get much more in than that!
  12. Add 1 campden tablet and potassium sorbate. Now leave your wine to clear.
  13. When clear, syphon it into another clean demijohn or bottle your wine ready for drinking.
  14. Enjoy your wine.

Date Wine

This date wine is a medium to sweet wine. It is a great old fashioned wine, more like a sweet sherry than anything else. It is also great for Christmas.

  • Ingredients

  • 500g raisins
  • 1.5kg sugar
  • High Alcohol yeast
  • Pectolase
  • Yeast Nutrient

Method

  1. Chop up the figs and raisins and put into a clean food grade bucket.
  2. Pour 4 pints of boiling water over the fruit and add the sugar.
  3. Leave overnight covered with a clean cloth
  4. On the next day add the rest of the ingredients and 2 pints of cold water.
  5. It should start bubbling within 24 hours.
  6. Stir and mash about a couple of times a day
  7. After 5 days strain off through a coarse straining bag.
  8. Place the liquid into a clean demijohn and top up to the shoulders with cold water. Fit an airlock and leave the wine to ferment  at room temperature. In colder months you may want to consider using a Brewbelt. This may take a few days or a couple of weeks depending on the temperature.
  9. When the bubbles stop coming through the airlock, or slow down to about one every 2 minutes test the wine.
  10. You can use a hydrometer or just taste it, if you like the taste go on to the next step. If you think it’s too sweet, hard luck because we warned you before you started! If too dry you could add more sugar and go for even more alcohol. Just add 50grams of sugar at a time until it really stops fermenting. But you won’t usually get much more in!
  11. Add 1 campden tablet and potassium sorbate.
  12. Leave to clear.
  13. When clear, syphon into a clean demijohn or bottle your wine ready for drinking.
  14. If it’s too dry you can always sweeten it a little more with sugar but make sure that it doesn’t start fermenting again. Leave it a couple of weeks then add a campden before bottling.

Apple Wine Recipe

There are still a lot of apples on trees around my neck of the woods. Many have fallen now though and are lying rotting on the ground. It’s such a terrible waste. If you have a supply of good apples, here’s a great Apple Wine Recipe for you.

Apple Wine

· 3kg Apples

· 1kg Sugar

· 250 ml grape concentrate

· 1 tsp. pectolase

· 1 Campden tablet

· Potassium sorbate

· Tannin

· Nutrient

· 1 tsp. acid blend or citric acid

· Yeast

1. Firstly pulp the apples into small pieces. You can crush, chop, grate or find some other way to do this. Then place them all into a clean sterilised fermenting bin or food grade bucket.

2. Pour 4 pints of boiling water over the fruit and add the sugar.

3. No allow it all to cool to room temperature and then add the rest of ingredients along with 2 pints of cold water.

4. Put into a clean demi john with an airlock topped up to the shoulders, (add a little more cold water if needed) and leave to ferment out.

5. It should start bubbling within 24 hours. If it doesn’t, add some more yeast as you may have killed the first batch by not allowing the fruit to cool off before adding.

6. After about 3 days strain off the solids, using a coarse straining bag.

7. Place the wine into a clean demi john with an airlock and leave to ferment out. This may take a few days, maybe even a couple of weeks depending on the temperature. Try to keep an even temperature. Use a Brewbelt if needed.

8. Once the bubbles have stopped coming through the airlock, or at least slow down to about once every couple of minutes, you should test your wine. You can either use a hydrometer or simply taste it. If it’s too sweet leave it longer. Otherwise syphon off into a clean demi john.

9. Now add 1 Campden tablet and potassium sorbate and leave it to clear.

10. Once clear, syphon again into another clean demi john for storage or bottle your wine.

11. If it’s too dry, you can always sweeten your wine a little with sugar but be careful that it doesn’t start fermenting again.

Enjoy your Apple Wine.

Rumtopf anyone?

Rumtopf - Betty 4.5 litres - CeramicA what? I hear you ask.

Well, a Rumtopf, which literally means rum pot, is actually a German dessert, which is traditionally eaten at Christmas time.  It is a  mixture of various fruits, rum and sugar. This is placed in a large stoneware pot which is known as a Rumtopf, where it is matured for several months.

After this time, the fruit will be very soft and saturated with rum. Making your own rumpot is easy and not bound by a strict recipe.

A Rumtopf is traditionally set up in the spring, and left in a a cool dark place, after which different ripe fruits are added to it over the summer months as they come into season.

The fruit is preserved in the rum ready to be eaten in the winter, when the Rumtopf has matured.

Typical fruits used include berries, plums, apricots and cherries.  In fact most fruits can be used, just use your imagination. Try strawberries, cherries, raspberries, black- and redcurrants, apricots, peaches, prunes, grapes, pears, apples, pineapples.

It is delicious served with ice cream or waffles. Pop the fruit into a glass of cheap bubbly for even more fun.

They make superb unusual gifts. Ideal for Father’s Day.
More Details – Rumtopf – Betty 4.5 litres – Ceramic

Wine Making Starter Kits

Beaverdale

If you are looking for a complete starter equipment kit, then the Beaverdale Starter Kit from Good Life Homebrew  is a great place to begin. It comes complete with everything you need to make your first 30 bottles of wine.

They have enhanced their Beaverdale Starter Kits to include some extra equipment to make your first home wine making job easier and as it only includes the equipment, you are free to choose whatever wine you wish. There are also several options for bottling your wine if you don’t already have a stock of bottles or a demijohn. Simply select your favourite wine from over twenty different wines available.
The starter kit  includes the following equipment: –

25 litre Plastic Fermenter
Airlock
Sterilising powder
Syphon tube with tap and sediment trap
Thermometer
Hydrometer
Test Jar

Beaverdale “Equipment only” Starter Kit – 30 Bottles

Wine Making Labels

If you are making a special batch of wine to keep or maybe for a wedding or party, then proper wine labels really do make a difference to the way your wine looks.

Stoney Creek Wine Labels are not just ordinary home made wine labels. They really are exceptionally good, professionally produced labels for home wine makers. They are also perfect if you buy wine but want to personalise it by adding your own tailor made or bespoke wine bottle labels.

Have a look at our page on wine labels to find out more. It really will surprise you what you can do.  Or go on over now to the Stoney Creek site and see for yourself.

Not only can you see what is available, but you can also download a demo of their Stoney Creek’s LabelMakerTM wine label software. With this you can try out your own designs and see just how good your own wine labels could look.

Wine Making At Home

Red Wine

Welcome to Wine In The Making’s blog where we will bring you all of the latest news and special offers from the world of homebrew and wine making.

If you have ever thought of making your own wine at home, then you are in good company. Millions of people around the world now make their own excellent home made wine. With ever increasing pub prices and the credit crunch, it’s hardly surprising.

If you tried making your own wine at home a few years ago but were disappointed with the results, then don’t worry. Things have moved on.

There are now some excellent wine making kits available and you can make some very good quality wine at home.

Our job is being here to offer advice and find you the best deals on the best wine kits and equipment around. So enjoy the site and then give it a go.

You won’t be disappointed.